Annie Raab: An Exit Interview

11265129_10206742397661197_2634512793555682836_nDear Annie Raab,

We are forever grateful for your service.

Love,

Whispering Prairie Press and Kansas City Voices

 

Annie Raab has worked with Whispering Prairie Press for three years. During that time she has demonstrated proficiency in her craft with a clear understanding of her role as executive board member, editor, and secretary. We thank her for her service and commitment on the board. We have the utmost respect for her as a writer and as a woman and although we are sad to see her leave, we are exciting to watch what adventures may unfold with her upcoming residency in Morocco.

Raab was accepted for the Green Olive Arts residency in Tetouan, Morrocco where she will live and work for one month from May 8 to June 5, 2016.  In addition she was awarded an ArtsKC Inspiration grant for her project. After she returns home, she plans to write about her experience. “When I return to Kansas City, I will be a better, more informed writer and critic,” she says, “I intend to use these skills to make the Kansas City art scene more globally-minded.”

Green Olive Arts is a global resource for emerging talent in terms of production opportunities and creative stimulation. “The residency at Green Olive Arts is a chance for me to weave the narratives and values of different cultures into something relatable,” she says.

As we bid farewell to her work with us and wish her luck with her upcoming ventures in Morrocco, we want to take a moment and share some fun things about Annie Raab that you may not know:

Raab loves laborious cooking and anything salty, vinegary, garlicky, or sour. “Laborious cooking is a way for me to use my brain,” she says, “but also free it up to experiment, think on stories, and tinker with problems. It’s kind of my preferred way to meditate (plus I love to feed people!).” If you have tried Raab’s “No Regrets Tortilla Soup” or her “Purple Cabbage Kimchi,” you would know that she puts as much energy and effort into her cooking as she does her writing and artwork. Every recipe, art project, and writing venture is precisely thought out, carefully constructed, and seamlessly executed. Raab is a meticulous chef and writes about it on www.annieraab.com.

Raab is known to write the most thoughtful rejection letters. “Literary magazines and seasoned writers will tell you not to take rejection personally,” she says, “but writing and making art is such a personal thing, it takes a lot of courage just to get it out the door.” Raab takes her editing responsibilities seriously. “I wore my service on the board as a badge of honor,” she says, “Although I don’t enjoy rejecting work, I enjoy giving individualized feedback on pieces that didn’t make it in the magazine. It lets me focus on the promising aspects of a story while encouraging the author to explore their work and themselves in a deeper, more meaningful way.” Needless to say, her personal and professional commitment to the rejection letters has gone unmatched.

Annie Raab is self-proclaimed “big-picture thinker.” She challenges ideas and engages in unpopular criticism backed by methodical research and carefully chosen language. “I don’t remain silent when I see something I don’t trust,” she says. We have thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated Raab’s need to challenge ideas and dig into deeper world issues. Her commitment to speaking out for equality, feminism, and a more widespread understanding of cultural norms is touching to say the least.

Thank you Annie Raab for your dedication.

To read Annie’s full interview answers in their entirety (yes they are that good) click here.

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